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Courses

Below, you'll find a list of all the courses we teach, along with a brief description of the content of the course.

Course Descriptions

  • General Education Courses *
  • Writing Intensive Courses WR
  • Speaking Intensive Courses SP

 

Criminal Justice 100 – Survey of Criminal Justice

This course is an introduction to the study of the criminal justice system in the United States. The history, theory and practice of the various subsystems within the criminal justice system will be explored. Additionally, the various indices that provide measures of crime in the United States, the role of the police, the courts and corrections in addressing the "crime problem," and selected Supreme Court decisions will be critically examined. 3 credits.

Criminal Justice 200 – Introduction to Corrections

The theory and practice of prison management and criminal rehabilitation are examined in this course. The overarching concepts of this course are: the functions of punishment and rehabilitation; historical and cross-cultural approaches to punishment, deterrence, and rehabilitation; current theories and practices; and future possibilities. The course is intended for those interested in the general study of sociology and criminal justice, prison administration, and complex organizations. 3 credits.

Criminal Justice 205 – Introduction to the U.S. Court System

This course is an introduction to the study of the United States Judicial System. The history, theory, and practice of the courts systems within the criminal justice system and its impact on the citizens of the United States will be explored. Additionally, the uniqueness of the dual courts system in the United States will be examined. 3 credits.

Criminal Justice 210 – Introduction to Policing

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to conduct a critical analysis of the institutions of policing and the social actors therein. Topics that will be covered include: sociological notions of policing; social research and policing; historical developments and evolution of policing institutions; police roles and functions; police authority; control of the police; police deviance; and the emergent police occupational subculture. 3 credits.

Criminal Justice 220 – Homicide

This course analyzes the impact of homicide on social order by examining prevalence and incidence data on homicide as well as the different types and patterns of this crime.  The relevant theoretical debates surrounding homicide causation and formation, both classic and current, will be presented along with supporting empirical material. Situational factors connecting homicide to other major crimes and the response of the criminal justice system will be examined for both typical cases and rare forms, such as serial murder. Emphasis is on how laws and crime control strategies are developed, implemented, and evaluated by the system to address homicide.  3 credits.  WR

Criminal Justice 295 – Special Topics

Selected topics in criminology and criminal justice. The topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 3 credits.

Criminal Justice 300 – Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections

This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the theoretical and practical aspects of probation, parole, and other aspects of community corrections beyond the introductory level. This course will utilize a variety of practitioners working in the field and we will be reading and analyzing the most current research in community corrections. Prerequisite:  CRIM100 or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

Criminal Justice 305 – White Collar Crime

This course examines white-collar crime from a broad theoretical perspective and with a focus on the methodological issues involved in research on the causes of such crimes. Issues surrounding the origin and conceptual definitions of white-collar crime are studied and critically assessed. The costs associated with white-collar crime, especially corporate crime are investigated and analyzed. Computer crime is given particular emphasis. Other topics that are examined include:  occupational crime, governmental crime, and state-corporate crime. The course gives particular emphasis to how the criminal justice system and the public respond to white-collar crimes.  Prerequisite:  CRIM 100 or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

Criminal Justice 312 – Studies Abroad

These courses are primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses on sociology. 1-18 credits.

Criminal Justice 323 – Gender and Crime

This course will integrate theoretical and empirical information on a wide variety of issues related to justice and women and issues surrounding women as criminal justice practitioners. Issues related to social control and gender, theoretical perspectives and empirical research on criminal offenders, the place of women, and the victimization of women will be examined. 3 credits. WR

Criminal Justice 330 – Violent Offending

This course addresses the incidence, prevalence, and nature of violent crime within the U.S. The most recent empirical data will be combined with current qualitative research to present an informed and broad perspective on violent criminal offending and the response of the criminal justice system.  Attention will be given to how both sociocultural and structural factors impact on patterns of crime at the macro and micro level.  Special emphasis is on how laws and crime control strategies are developed, implemented, and evaluated by the system to address criminal violence. 3 credits. WR

Criminal Justice 335 – Juvenile Delinquency

In this course students explore the diversity of delinquent behavior, the process of becoming delinquent, the importance of legislation, the law enforcement apparatus, the courts, and juvenile correctional facilities in the development of delinquent identities. 3 credits.

Criminal Justice 340 – Issues in Policing

This course examines the fundamental issues in policing a democratic society including but not limited to the  police mission, subculture, performance measurement, moral hazards, discretion, impact on crime, use of force, police occupational stress, legitimacy, community policing, and police reform issues. 3 credits.

Criminal Justice 401 – Issues in Criminal Justice

This course invites students to participate in a critical analysis of the American Criminal Justice System. The administration of "justice" as a selective process and the social and political contexts and contests within which social control is articulated will be explored in this course. Particular attention is given to the front line criminal judicial agencies and actors that serve to reproduce order. Inherent in the examination of the criminal justice processes are specific inquiries into social, political and economic struggles that characteristically reflect fundamental issues of social inequality. Institutional structures and their attendant networks are explained in relationship to the state and its differential networks. The nature of the criminal justice agencies and actors, degrees of enforcement and interrelationships with coercive agencies will be investigated. 3 credits.

Criminal Justice 402 – Criminological Theory

An historical analysis of the theories that have been developed to explain crime.  Beginning with Cesare Beccaria's An Essay on Crimes and Punishment published in 1764, other writers to be considered include but are not be limited to Lombroso, Durkheim, Marx, Weber, Merton, The Chicago School scholars and Chesney-Lind.  The discussion will focus on both the causes of "street" and white collar crimes. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 3 credits. 

Criminal Justice 409 – Administrative Issues in Criminal Justice

This course examines the structure and process of criminal justice administration in contemporary American society. Topics include the police, courts, and corrections.  Special attention will be given to administration and leadership practices and challenges in these criminal justice organizations, inter-organizational relations, and public relations issues. 3 credits.

Criminal Justice 410 – Crime and Communities

This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the theoretical and practical aspects concerning the criminology of place. Topics that will be covered include the ecology of crime; routine activities; social disorganization; human ecology; geographic profiling; and crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED). Prerequisite: CRIM 100. 3 credits

Criminal Justice 455 – Constitutional Law for Criminal Justice Professionals

This course will focus heavily on Supreme Court decisions that directly impact the criminal justice profession. Specific attention will be devoted to the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments. The Patriot Act and Terrorism Bill will also be discussed at length. Prerequisites: CRIM 100, 200, and 210. 3 credits..

Criminal Justice 461 – Senior Seminar in Criminology and Criminal Justice

This course is a seminar for the senior criminology & criminal justice major, designed to integrate knowledge of specific sub-fields into a comprehensive view of the discipline and its role in relation to other sciences. Open only to senior criminology and criminal justice majors. 3 credits. WR and SP

Criminal Justice 490 – Directed Independent Study

Individualized study. Must be approved by head of department. 1-18 credits. Fulfills General Education Goal 15.

Criminal Justice 492 – Internship in Criminology and Criminal Justice

This course provides direct student learning in applied settings that permits a practiced supervised experience. Students learn through performance in meaningful tasks in a variety of social environments. Prerequisite: 18 hours of Criminology/Criminal Justice and Sociology credits taken at Longwood combined. Students' cumulative GPA must be 2.0 or above to be eligible for internship. Must be arranged at least one semester in advance with chair of department. May be repeated in subsequent semesters. Variable credit; no more than 15 total credits may be earned. Only six credit hours of Internship will earn quality points (A, B, C, and D grades); all credits earned beyond six credits will be assigned Pass/Fail grades. 1-15 credits. SP  Fulfills General Education Goal 15.

Criminal Justice 495 – Special Topics

Selected topics in criminology and criminal justice. The topics may vary from semester to semester.  May be repeated for credit when topics change. 3 credits.

Criminal Justice 496 – Professional Study in Criminal Justice

This course provides students with the opportunity to apply rigorous theoretical and methodological considerations and analysis to the practical training and experience gained in acquiring professional accreditation within the criminal justice profession. Accumulated GPA 2.50 or above and permission of the department chair, arranged at least one semester in advance. Only six credit hours of CRIM 496 will earn quality points (A, B, C, and D grades); all credits earned beyond six credits will be assigned Pass/Fail grades. Prerequisites: 18 hours of sociology/criminology courses. Sociology or Criminal Justice seniors only. 3-15 credits. SP  Fulfills General Education Goal 15.

Criminal Justice 498 – Honors Research in Criminal Justice

Students conduct research in criminology and/or criminal justice under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee. May be repeated as 499. 3 credits.

 

Advising Resources

2011 and subsequent catalogs:

catalogs prior to 2011:

Course Rotation

Criminal Justice Course Rotation (pdf)