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News & Events

Infant and Toddler Connection Service Coordinator gets an award from the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services.

 

Virginia Governor Robert F. McDonnell has proclaimed May 2012 as Early Intervention Awareness Month in the Commonwealth of Virginia (click her to view the Certificate of Recognition). The proclamation calls attention to the 16,000 infants and toddlers in Virginia who have developmental delays and disabilities. It is crucial that these children receive immediate intervention and treatment upon diagnosis.

The Infant and Toddler Connection (ITC) of Virginia provides early intervention services for more than 16,000 infants and toddlers with development delays and disabilities and their families throughout the Commonwealth. In 2005 Longwood became the lead agency for the ITC of the Heartland, which provides for early intervention services for the counties of Amelia, Buckingham, Charlotte, Cumberland, Lunenburg, Nottoway, and Prince Edward. Carol Cousins is system manager for the ITC of the Heartland located in Longwood's Center for Communication, Literacy, and Learning (LCCLL).

"The first three years of a baby's life are very important. Infants and toddlers begin to develop the skills they will need for the rest of their lives," said Cousins. "Early intervention helps to identify if a developmental delay exists in children from birth up to age three and provides support and services to address the delay. Our program here at ITC of the Heartland provides services to around 70 children. It is extremely rewarding to see the progress these little ones can make and to know what a positive impact this can have on how they function throughout their lifetime."

Dr. Lissa Power-deFur, associate professor and graduate coordinator for communication sciences and disorders at Longwood University and director of the LCCLL, serves on the Virginia Interagency Coordinating Council for Early Intervention Services (VICC). As an advisory council to the executive branch of state government, the VICC promotes and coordinates early intervention services in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As a representative of higher education Dr. Power-deFur addresses issues associated with the preparation of future professionals who will work with infants and toddlers.

Located in downtown Farmville, the LCCLL offers early intervention services; speech and language evaluation and intervention for children and adults; and tutoring services for school-aged children. For further information please contact the ITC of the Heartland at 434.395.2967 or the LCCLL at 434.395.2972.

 

 

May designated as Early Intervention Awareness Month

April 20, 2014

Virginia Governor Timothy M. Kaine has proclaimed May 2009 as Early Intervention Awareness Month in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The proclamation calls attention to the 16,000 infants and toddlers in Virginia who have developmental delays and disabilities. It is crucial that these children receive immediate intervention and treatment upon diagnosis.

The Infant and Toddler Connection (ITC) of Virginia provides early intervention services for more than 16,000 infants and toddlers with development delays and disabilities and their families throughout the Commonwealth. In 2005 Longwood became the lead agency for the ITC of the Heartland, which provides for early intervention services for the counties of Amelia, Buckingham, Charlotte, Cumberland, Lunenburg, Nottoway, and Prince Edward. Carol Cousins is system manager for the ITC of the Heartland located in Longwood's Center for Communication, Literacy, and Learning (LCCLL).

"The first three years of a baby's life are very important. Infants and toddlers begin to develop the skills they will need for the rest of their lives," said Cousins. "Early intervention helps to identify if a developmental delay exists in children from birth up to age three and provides support and services to address the delay. Our program here at ITC of the Heartland provides services to around 70 children. It is extremely rewarding to see the progress these little ones can make and to know what a positive impact this can have on how they function throughout their lifetime."

Dr. Lissa Power-deFur, associate professor and graduate coordinator for communication sciences and disorders at Longwood University and director of the LCCLL, serves on the Virginia Interagency Coordinating Council for Early Intervention Services (VICC). As an advisory council to the executive branch of state government, the VICC promotes and coordinates early intervention services in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As a representative of higher education Dr. Power-deFur addresses issues associated with the preparation of future professionals who will work with infants and toddlers.

Located in downtown Farmville, the LCCLL offers early intervention services; speech and language evaluation and intervention for children and adults; and tutoring services for school-aged children. For further information please contact the ITC of the Heartland at 434.395.2967 or the LCCLL at 434.395.2972.

 

Dr. Lissa Power-deFur appointed to Governor's Council

April 20, 2014

Governor Timothy M. Kaine has appointed Dr. Lissa Power-deFur, associate professor and graduate coordinator for communication sciences and disorders at Longwood University and director of the Longwood Center for Communication, Literacy and Learning, to the Virginia Interagency Coordinating Council for Early Intervention Services (VICC).

As an advisory council to the executive branch of state government, the purpose of the VICC is to promote and coordinate early intervention services in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As a representative of higher education Dr. Power-deFur will have an opportunity to address issues associated with the preparation of future professionals who will work with infants and toddlers. Longwood's Communication Sciences and Disorders graduate program provides future speech-language pathologists to work under the direction of a faculty member providing early intervention services in the natural environment, typically the child's home.

Throughout my professional career as a speech-language pathologist I have been committed to providing early intervention services for children, said Dr. Power-deFur, a certified speech-language pathologist. One of my first clinical opportunities, prior to passage of the federal mandate for early intervention services, was working with an infant with hearing impairment which convinced me of the critical nature of early identification and intervention. This focus has remained throughout my career.

Dr. Power-deFur earned her master's and doctorate degrees in speech-language pathology from the University of Virginia. While working in special education and student services at the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE), she was involved in various preschool and early intervention initiatives and served as an alternate representative to the VICC for the VDOE. She also represented VDOE on the Virginia Hearing Impairment Identification and Monitoring System initiative and co-authored the parent guide to hearing impairment.

In 2004 Dr. Power-deFur joined the faculty at Longwood University, and was instrumental in creating the new graduate program in Communication Sciences and Disorders. In 2005, Longwood became the lead agency for the Infant and Toddler Connection of the Heartland. This program provides for early intervention services for the counties of Amelia, Buckingham, Charlotte, Cumberland, Lunenburg, Nottoway, and Prince Edward since 2005. In addition to her work preparing future speech-language pathologists, Dr. Power-deFur directs Longwood's Center for Communication, Literacy, and Learning (LCCLL), which is located in downtown Farmville. In addition to offering early intervention services, the speech and language evaluation and intervention for children and adults, and tutoring services for school-aged children for the Southside Virginia community. For further information please contact the Center at 395-2972.

 

Angel Tree gifts benefit Infant and Toddler Connection families

April 20, 2014

Angel Tree gifts benefit Infant and Toddler Connection families 2008 (from left) Theresa Anders, Carol Cousins, Diane Jackson and Sonya Edmonds assemble gift bags for children served by the Infant and Toddler Connection of the Heartland.

Longwood University’s chapter of the National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NSSLHA) sponsored an Angel Tree to collect Christmas gifts for children served by the Infant and Toddler Connection (ITC) of the Heartland. The ITC helps identify if any child from birth to age three has a developmental delay and provides supports and services in the child’s home to address that delay. The ITC program provides early intervention services in a seven county region (Amelia, Buckingham, Charlotte, Cumberland, Lunenburg, Nottoway and Prince Edward). 

"Thanks to the kindness of this community, more than 65 children throughout the seven counties we serve will have something under their tree this Christmas," said Carol Cousins, system manager for the early intervention program. In addition to the support provided by students and faculty at Longwood, Wal-Mart sponsored an Angel Tree to support the ITC.         

Tara Boyle, a senior communication sciences and disorders major and a member of the NSSLHA, organized the project. "The Angel Tree is incredibly important to our community," said Boyle. "We should never forget that we are a part of a much larger family and the Angel Tree is a great way to be a part of that family."

Dr. Peggy Agee, faculty sponsor for the student organization, said "This project is one that permits the Longwood community to assist a very special group of children—infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities—to have a Merry Christmas.  What could be more worthwhile than that?" 

Theresa Anders, developmental educator for the ITC, organized the gift distribution. "I was a little concerned that this year’s Angel Tree participation would be lessened due to the current recession and economic hardships. However, I am pleasantly surprised and enormously proud of the people of this community. They not only gave, they gave generously. We can confidently say that every family with a child in our program will have something to open this Christmas. The Farmville area community has just reinforced why we call our program the Infant and Toddler Connection of the HEARTland."  

For more information about services offered by the ITC, contact 434.395.2972 or visit Infant & Toddler Connection website.