Text Size Default Text SizeDefault Text Size Large Text SizeLarge Text Size Largest Text SizeLargest Text Size Print Print this Page

Social Work & Communication Disorders

Linwood Cousins, Chair
Peggy Turner, Administrative Assistant

Social Work Program

Faculty

Theresa A. Clark, PhD, Associate Professor of Social Work and Area Coordinator
Linwood Cousins, PhD, Associate Professor of Social Work
Kristen McAleavey, PhD, Assistant Professor of Social Work
Mary Beth Stebbins, MSW, Lecturer and Director of Field Education

Mission Statement

The mission of the Longwood University undergraduate Social Work Program is to prepare practitioners who have a foundation for social work knowledge, theory and research through a strong liberal arts based education; to prepare competent and effective generalist practitioners who become citizen leaders in their respective communities, while representing and empowering oppressed individuals, groups, and communities to improve the quality of life; to reduce the inequalities in society through the use of social justice strategies and effective practice; and to contribute to the knowledge base of practice, research, and theory development about the needs of diverse populations served by professional social workers.

Goals

  • Provide strong liberal arts based education that incorporates coursework from the natural sciences, humanities, social sciences, and mathematics and computer sciences.
  • Provide guided field instruction experiences that promote the delivery of effective services to diverse populations.
  • Provide social work curricula that build on the knowledge and skills acquired in the liberal arts education and that focuses on research, knowledge, theories and skills that develop effective generalists' social work practitioners.
  • Encourage understanding and respect for the person-in-environment conceptualization, diversity, inequalities and changing needs of a complex society and use this information to address social injustices.
  • Support faculty and student research and knowledge building to ensure excellence in learning and teaching.

Objectives

Upon completion of the Social Work Program, social work students should be able to:

  • Communicate effectively, both orally and in writing, with diverse constituencies.
  • Think critically and apply analytic skills in understanding current issues and in providing effective services to diverse clientele.
  • Use current technology to locate and disseminate information.
  • Understand the biological and psychosocial developmental stages of individuals.
  • Recognize the importance of diversity and its implications for effective social work practice.
  • Understand the core values that form the basis of the profession of Social Work to include service, social justice, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence.
  • Integrate knowledge, skills and abilities to provide direct and indirect services in diverse practice settings.
  • Use information gained from continuous self-assessment to recognize when changes in behavior and practice are needed.
  • Enable faculty to engage in research, practice, and other knowledge building activities.
  • Synthesize and use various theoretical approaches in understanding the needs of clientele and in the provision of services to clientele at the micro, mid and macro levels of practice.
  • Conduct and understand the results of research projects and apply the information to practice settings of diverse sizes.
  • Present self in a professional manner.
  • Recognize the impact of oppression and discrimination on such groups as women, gays and lesbians, older Americans, disabled, African-Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans and other groups identified as being treated in an inequitable manner in society.
  • Use knowledge and skills to reduce inequalities and injustices in society.

Admissions Process

Any student accepted to Longwood University may declare Social Work as a major. However, the student will be officially accepted to the Social Work Program at the conclusion of their sophomore year after established criteria have been met.

To be admitted to Longwood University Social Work Program, a student must:

  • Submit a completed application to the Social Work Program by the Friday before spring break of the sophomore year.
  • Provide two professional references with one from a Longwood Social Work professor.
  • Complete 55 earned credit hours, which must include successful completion of ENG 150, SOWK 200 & 201. Completion of SOCL 101, PSYC 101, MATH 171 & BIOL 101 is strongly recommended within the 55 credit hours. Transfer students who meet the above criteria upon entering Longwood must complete one semester at Longwood and provide a reference from one of Longwood's Social Work professors. (A recommended course of study is included in the student handbook that students declaring Social Work as their major receive.)
  • Have a 2.25 cumulative grade point average (which is the current GPA requirement to enter field instruction).
  • Earned no grade less that a C- in any Social Work course.
  • Complete a satisfactory interview with the Social Work Faculty.

The Program in Social Work provides an undergraduate course of study of unique and personalized instruction accredited by the Council on Social Work Education, leading to the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts in Social Work. The curriculum prepares graduates for first-level professional social work practice as practitioners utilizing the generalist perspective base. Program graduates frequently pursue advanced study in graduate schools and may be eligible for admission into advanced standing one-year M.S.W. degree programs. They may utilize their professional credentials for careers in the expanding opportunities for first-level, generalist-based, professional practitioners according to the standards of the National Association of Social Workers in such areas as:

  • Addiction Treatment
  • Adoption
  • Case Management
  • Child Protective Services
  • Child Welfare
  • Community Mental Health
  • Criminal & Youth Court Services
  • Crisis Intervention
  • Disaster Relief
  • Domestic Violence
  • Employee Assistance Programming
  • Family Planning
  • Family Preservation
  • Foster Care
  • Geriatric Services
  • Health Care
  • Home Health Care
  • Homelessness
  • Hospice Care
  • Hospital Social Work
  • International Social Work
  • Parenting Education
  • Policy Advocacy
  • Rural Social Work
  • School Social Work
  • Veterans Services

The faculty of the Social Work Program, reflecting the generalist orientation, focus on each student's personal and professional growth and development. Specifically, the Program faculty members individualize much of the student's education and actual agency-based instruction as they assist each student to develop a professional knowledge, skill and attitude base through strategically placed personalized evaluations and discussions of their education and process of professional emergence.

Junior Field Instruction consists of an agency placement or field practicum concurrent with integrative course work and involves 180 hours of instruction in a field setting. A grade point average of 2.25 both in the major and overall is required for placement in a field instruction setting. Students transferring into the program later in their academic pursuits are afforded the opportunity to enter the accelerated 9 1/2-week summer program. Senior Field Instruction usually occurs during the last semester and consists of 600 hours (15 weeks, 40 hours per week) of field instruction in an agency setting. Only those students who are social work degree candidates may be admitted to the field practicum experiences. Enrollment in social work practice courses (SOWK 330, 425, and 430) is restricted to social work majors only! Practicum experiences are readily available throughout the state, and many students choose to live at home during this experience, thus saving money and greatly enhancing their professional career entry. The Social Work Program, in compliance with CSWE accreditation standards, grants no academic credit for life experience and/or previous work experience in lieu of the field practicum or in lieu of courses in the professional foundation content areas.

Social Work Major, BA Or BS Degree

A. General Education Core Requirement/41 credits

See General Education Requirements

B. Additional Requirements for B.A. Degree/6 credits
Additional Requirements for B.S. Degree/7 credits

See Degree Requirements

C. Major Requirements/69 credits

Core Courses/54 credits
SOWK 200 Introduction to the Human Services/3 credits
SOWK 201 Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare/3 credits
SOWK 300 Social Problems and the Development of Social Policy/3 credits
SOWK 301 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I/3 credits
SOWK 302 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II/3 credits
SOWK 320 Social Work Research and Evaluation Design/3 credits
SOWK 325 Human Diversity: Populations-at-Risk/3 credits
SOWK 330 Methods: Practice 1 Individuals and Families/4 credits
SOWK 392 Junior Field Instruction Internship/6 credits
SOWK 425 Methods: Practice II Social Work Practice with Groups/4 credits
SOWK 430 Methods: Practice III Communities and Organizations/4 credits
SOWK 492 Senior Field Instruction Internship/15 credits (one credit satisfies General Education Goal 15)

Social Work Electives/15 credits

D. General Electives for BA Degree/5 credits
General Electives for BS Degree/4 credits

E. Total Credits Required for BA or BS in Social Work/120 credits

Social Work Course Descriptions (SOWK)

General Education Course*
Writing Intensive Course**
Speaking Intensive Course***
A special fee is charged for all Field Instruction Internship courses!

Social Work 200. Introduction to the Human Services. The course introduces the broad range of human service professions designed to provide a wide variety of services to individuals, groups, the community, and the larger society. Further, the course explores the relationship between social problems and human needs, and the development of human service agencies and institutions in response. 3 credit hours

Social Work 201. Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare. This course is designed to introduce students seeking to become generalist social workers (entry-level practitioners) to the unique aspects of the social work profession. The historic development of social work and social welfare and the relationship to effective provision of intervention services, which are based on the profession's knowledge, skills, and values. 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: SOWK 200

Social Work 295. Special Topics. Selected topics in Social Work. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

Social Work 300. Social Problems and the Development of Social Policy. The development of social policies in response to social problems is examined with a special emphasis on the impact of social injustices. The history of the relationship between social work practice and social policy development is explored. Students are encouraged to view social policy practice as a viable and bona fide multi system social work practice intervention. Analytic skills, interactional skills, political skills, and value-clarifying skills are primary skill areas that students build on in preparation for policy analysis and development. 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: SOWK 201. ***

Social Work 301. Human Behavior and the Social Environment I. Part one of a two-part foundation course, using the general systems approach, the student will develop a multi-level perspective of human behavior in the areas of personality development and self-concept in the context of community and organizational systems, group processes, personal change dynamics, family systems, and life cycles. Concurrent focus is placed on the relevancy of the theory base. . Integrated into this course as well is content on human diversity and populations at risk, a strengths perspective, and the values and ethics of social work practice. Prerequisites: SOCL 101. 3 credits:

Social Work 302. Human Behavior and the Social Environment II. The second of a two part course, which continues the application of a multidimensional perspective in an examination of human behavior across the life span and in terms of biological, social and psychological processes. This course primarily emphasizes models and theories of human behavior in families, groups, organizations, institutions and communities, all from an ecological and systems perspective. Integrated into this course as well is content on human diversity and populations at risk, a strengths perspective, and the values and ethics of social work practice. 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 **

Social Work 305. Social Work with Older Americans. This course will explore the diverse mandates for social welfare services and for the providers of these services, especially professional social workers. In addition, the course will provide an overview of the aging process and how it impacts the individual, family, and ultimately society. Further, the course will examine the interface between older Americans and social problems, social policies and the rights of older Americans. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Sociology 101.

Social Work 309. Human Sexual Adjustment. Socio-cultural influences on gender identity and sexual behavior will be analyzed and issues regarding sexual expression and sexual dysfunctioning will be explored. Methods of dealing with sexual adjustment difficulties at both the individual and community levels are presented including human service

Social Work 311-312. Studies Abroad. Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses in social work. 1-18 credits.

Social Work 320. Social Work Research and Evaluation Design. The role of scientific inquiry in the continuing development of knowledge and practice skill, measures of accountability, needs assessment, and evaluation design is presented. Students conduct agency research and assessments and study the impact of applied scientific techniques on the design and delivery of professional practice. Prerequisite:
MATH 171. 3 credits. **

Social Work 325. Human Diversity: Populations-at-Risk. Conceptual frameworks for understanding human diversity with a special emphasis on understanding self will under gird the identification and study of populations-at-risk in society. The dynamics of social injustices and the impact on diverse groups in society are explored. Students will develop competent skills to provide services to diverse clientele at multilevel systems. 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 ***

Social Work 330. Methods: Practice I Individuals and Families. A generalist model of practice is presented which emphasizes a problem-solving approach toward assisting clients/ consumers of social work services. The primary framework discussed in this course will be theories employing a generalist social work model. Content area required by CSWE is included and focuses on issues of diversity, populations-at-risk, social and economic justice, and social work values and ethics. Along with SOWK 425 and SOWK 430, this course builds theoretical and practice knowledge, skills, and values, which are used to assist individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations in a wide range of social welfare/ human services settings. (4 credit course) Prerequisites: SOWK 301, 302 (4 credit course) Prerequisites: SOWK 301, 302

Social Work 337. Family and Children's Services. Major concepts of family and child welfare are presented and trends in relevant policy, services and practice skills related to supportive, supplemental and substitutive programs are analyzed. Prerequisite: SOWK 300 or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

Social Work 390. Directed or Independent Study. Must be approved by the head of the department. May be repeated as 391. 1-18 credits.

Social Work 392. Junior Field Instruction Internship. This is the first of two sequential courses. This course is open only to majors with junior status. Students will spend 14 hours per week in a local community agency under the supervision of an agency based field instructor. The purpose of this course is intended to begin the application of beginning level practice skills in working with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities from a generalist perspective. Reinforces students' identification with the purposes, values, and ethics of the Social Work profession. Field education is systematically designed, supervised, coordinated, and evaluated based on criteria by which students demonstrate the achievement of program objectives. Semester Course: 6 credits. Prequisite SOWK 330. !

Social Work 425. Methods: Practice II Social Work Practice with Groups. Students will develop theoretical and practice knowledge and skills regarding group practice in various human service settings and contexts. Students will integrate an eco-systems perspective, knowledge, and skills regarding social work ethics and values, principles of human diversity, social justice, populations at risk, and a strengths perspective. This course will review and apply different theoretical approaches and practice methods to social work with various kinds of small groups, including therapy or counseling groups, socialization and education groups, support and self-help groups, various task groups and social action groups. Emphasis is placed on the role of social work practice with groups in the promotion of well-being and optimal functioning. 4 credits. Pre-requisites: SOWK301 and SOWK302.

Social Work 430. Methods: Practice III Communities and Organizations. This course introduces theories and concepts for socially and culturally competent social work practice in communities and organizations. Students examine the roles of communities and organizations within and beyond the context of traditional social work practice with individuals, families, small groups, organizations and large systems. Students will integrate social work's historical and contemporary emphasis on empowerment, a strengths perspective, human and cultural diversity, populations at risk, and the values and ethics of social work practice. Political action, advocacy, and related collaborative approaches for building and strengthening communities, neighborhoods, and organizations will be stressed. 4 credit hours. Prerequisite: SW 392.

Social Work 461. Topical Seminar in Social Work. A series of topical lectures, presentations and discussions concerning areas of current concern to practitioners in a variety of welfare settings. Emphasis is placed on practice related material and the involvement of practitioners from local agencies is encouraged. 1-3 credits.

Social Work 462. Delivering Hospice Care. A skills approach to the provision of hospice care to the terminally ill. Physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs unique to this client population will be presented. 1 credit.

Social Work 490. Directed or Independent Study. Must be approved by the head of the department. May be repeated. 1-18 credits.

Social Work 492. Senior Field Instruction Internship. This course is open only to majors with senior status. Forty hours per week in a local community agency under the supervision of an agency based field instructor will be a major component to the course. The total hours of senior field instruction (SOWK 492) is 600 hours upon placement. SOWK 492 is intended to extrapolate and build from Junior Field Instruction beginning level practice skills with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. The purpose of this course is to reinforce students' identification with the purpose, values, and ethics of the social work profession. Field education is systematically designed, supervised, coordinated, and evaluated on the basis of criteria by which students demonstrate the achievement of program objectives. SOWK 492 is a semester course of 15 credits. Prerequisite classes include: SOWK 330, 425, and 430 with a 2.25 G.P.A average overall. * !

Social Work 495. Special Topics. Selected topics in Social Work. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

Social Work 498. Honors Research in Social Work. Students conduct research in social work under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee. May be repeated as 499. 3 credits.

Communication Sciences and Disorders Program

Faculty

Peggy Agee, MEd, Instructor and Undergraduate Program Coordinator
Gayle Daly, MS, Instructor and Speech-Language Clinical Director
Lissa Power-deFur, PhD, Associate Professor and Graduate Program Coordinator
Michele Norman, PhD, Assistant Professor

Program Mission Statement

The Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSDS) Program is dedicated to providing a comprehensive education in human communication processes and in the prevention, assessment, and treatment of communication disorders across the lifespan. The program is committed to providing students in the undergraduate program with comprehensive pre-professional academic and observation experiences for entrance into a graduate program in speech language, pathology, audiology, deaf education, or related field.

Undergraduate Program

The Bachelor of Science degree program in Communication Sciences and Disorders is a pre-professional program that provides academic training in the normal process of speech, language, hearing, and their associated pathologies. The coursework provides the foundation for pursuing a master's degree in speech-language pathology or audiology, the entry-level degree in the profession. One of the objectives of the CSDS undergraduate program is to prepare students to apply to graduate school in Communication Disorders.

Admission to the Communication Sciences and Disorders Major

All students first entering the College of Education and Human Services (CEHS) who wish to pursue a bachelor's degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders must meet the following criteria prior to registration for CSDS courses at and beyond the 300 level:

  • Completion of 45 credit hours with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75
  • Demonstration of competency in written and oral English as evidenced by no less than a grade of "C" in English 150 or the equivalent course or courses in a community college or another university.

Students may enroll in a few selected courses required for the CSDS major while they are moving toward satisfying the above requirements. These courses include CSDS 201, CSDS 206, CSDS 207, CSDS 285, CSDS 290, COMM 101, and EDUC 245. Each student will receive personalized academic counseling from full-time faculty in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Program.

Students transferring from other colleges and universities and entering Longwood University with junior level standing may register for CSDS courses at and beyond the 300 level as long as they have met the criteria described above at their previous institution.

Communication Sciences And Disorders Major, BS Degree

A. General Education Core Requirements/41 Credits

Goal 12: Choose one of the following courses:
PSYC 371 or PSYC 373 or PSYC 375/3 credits

Goal 13: Recommended choice: PHIL 315/3 credits

B. Additional Degree Requirements/7 credits

MATH 171 Statistical Decision Making/3 credits
Natural Science/4 credits


C. Major Requirements/57 credits

To satisfy major requirements for graduation, students majoring in Communication Sciences and Disorders mush earn a grade of no less than C in all CSDS courses and an overall GPA of 2.75.

CSDS 201 Introduction to Communication Disorders /3 credits
CSDS 206 Introduction to Sign Language and Other Modes of Communication for the Hearing Impaired/3 credits
CSDS 207 Sign Language/Hearing Impaired Communication/3 credits
EDUC 245 Human Growth and Development /3 credits
CSDS 285 Language Development Across the Life Span/3 credits
CSDS 290 Morphology and Syntax/1 credit
CSDS 307 Phonetics/3 credits
CSDS 313 Anatomy & Physiology of Speech & Hearing Mechanisms/3 credits
CSDS 314 Phonology and Language Disorders/3 credits
CSDS 361 Introduction to Audiology and Hearing Science /3 credits
CSDS 430 Language and Literacy/3 credits
CSDS 450 Speech Science/3 credits
CSDS 455 Neurology in Human Communication/3 credits
CSDS 489 Introduction to Clinical Practice/*2 credits
SPED 305 Behavior Management, Part 1/3 credits
SPED 489 Survey of Exceptional Children/3 credits
EDUC 381 Media and Technology/1 credits
COMM 101 Oral Communication/3 credits
ENGL 380 Children's Literature/3 credits
ENGL 470 Professional Writing Skills/3 credits
Choose one of the following:
SOWK 325 Human Diversity: Populations at Risk/3 credits
SOCL 233 Race, Class, and Gender/3 credits
PSYC 384 Cross-Cultural Psychology/3 credits
HLTH 210 World Health Issues /3 credits
*One credit from CSDS 489 satisfies General Education Goal 15

D. Electives/15 credits

Program Electives/6 credits

A minimum of 6 credit hours must be selected from the following list:
SOCL 102 Contemporary Social Problems/3 credits
HLTH 275 Medical Terminology/2 credits
ENGL 382 Traditional and Modern English Grammar/3 credits
SOCL 320 Sociology of Education/3 credits
open to juniors and seniors only
PSYC 453 Psycholinguistics/3 credits

General Electives/9 credits

E. Total credits required for a BS in Communication Sciences and Disorders/120

Communication Sciences And Disorders Course Descriptions (CSDS)

**Writing Intensive course
***Speaking intensive course

Communication Sciences and Disorders 201. Introduction to Communication Disorders. An overview of the field of communication disorders, including the professions of speech-language pathologist and audiologist. 3 credits.

Communication Sciences and Disorders 206. Introduction to Sign Language and Other Modes of Communication for the Hearing Impaired. To promote understanding of communication modalities used with Hearing Impaired persons, including cued language, speech reading, verbal communication, and to demonstrate proficiency in beginning sign language. 3 credits.

Communication Sciences and Disorders 207. Sign Language/Hearing Impaired Communication. This intermediate level course is intended to improve or advance the communication skills of those students whose core vocabulary of signed languages and knowledge of deafness has already been established. Active learning strategies are designed to move the students from entry level to a level of proficiency necessary to communicate with members of the Deaf community or with hearing-impaired individuals whose sign language parallels English. Prerequisite Communication Sciences and Disorders 207.3 credits.

Communication Sciences and Disorders 285. Language Development Across the Lifespan. An introduction to the normal acquisition of language, including the components of language, the physical, social, and cognitive bases for language, theories of language development, and how language evolves from infancy through adulthood to senescence. Cultural influences on language development will also be explored. 3 credits.

Communication Sciences and Disorders 290. Morphology and Syntax. This course is designed to acquaint students with the morphologic and syntactic terminology used in the analysis of language samples. 1 credit.

Communication Sciences and Disorders 295. Special Topics. Selected topics in Communication Disorders The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change 1-3 credits.

Communication Sciences and Disorders 307. Phonetics. The phonetic structure of the English Language, its dialects and derivations; clinical application of the International Phonetic Alphabet 3 credits.

Communication Sciences and Disorders 313. Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms. Anatomical structures of the human communication system and the physiology of inter-related movements. Prerequisite: Biology 101 or permission of instructor 3 credits.

Communication Sciences and Disorders 314. Phonology and Language Disorders. The identification and evaluation of phonological and language disorders in children and adolescents, etiological factors, and basic assessment and management procedures for a culturally and linguistically diverse populations Prerequisites: Communication Sciences and Disorders 285 & 307 or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

Communication Sciences and Disorders 361. Introduction to Audiology and Hearing Science. Physics of sound; physiology of hearing; types and amounts of hearing loss; hearing evaluation: audiometry. Prerequisite: Communication Sciences and Disorders 313 or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

Communication Sciences and Disorders 430. Language and Literacy. Overview of the relationship between language and literacy Learning outcomes target the specific skills for professionals in communication disorders including: phonological and phonemic awareness, development of expressive language, and a focus on collaborative practice with classroom teachers. Therapeutic strategies, which integrate listening, thinking, speaking, reading and writing, are targeted for all children. Prerequisite: Communication Sciences and Disorders 314 or consent of instructor. 3 credits. **

Communication Sciences and Disorders 450. Speech Science. An introduction to speech science theory, instrumentation, and measurement Emphasis on normal speech perception and production Pre-requisites: Communication Sciences and Disorders 307 & 313. 3 credits.

Communication Sciences and Disorders 455. Neurology in Human Communications. An overview of neurology as it relates to communication and communication disorders. Prerequisite: Communication Sciences and Disorders 313. 3 credits.

Communication Sciences and Disorders 489. Introduction to Clinical Practice. Class instruction related to clinical methods and practicum experience plus 20 hours field experience with a Speech-Language Pathologist or Audiologist Prerequisites: Communication Sciences and Disorders 314 or consent of instructor 2 credits. ** and ***

Communication Sciences and Disorders 495. Special Topics. Selected topics in Communication Disorders. The topics will vary from semester to semester. Descriptions will be available from academic advisors. May be repeated for credit when topics change Prerequisite: Communication Sciences and Disorders 314 1-3 credits.