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Mathematics and Computer Science

William P. Abrams, Chair
Gale Moss, Secretary

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science offers courses leading to majors in mathematics and computer science, and minors in mathematics and computer science. It also offers courses which fulfill general education and Bachelor of Science degree requirements.

ASSESSMENT: The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science requires all majors to participate in any required assessment activities, including, as seniors, taking a comprehensive test. The purpose of the test is to assess the progress of the majors and the effectiveness of the program.

Teaching Endorsement

Students who are preparing to teach and who are majoring in fields other than mathematics may be endorsed to teach mathematics courses through Algebra I in grades 6 - 12. See the Algebra I Endorsement below for details.

MATHEMATICS PROGRAM

Faculty

William P. Abrams, PhD, Professor of Mathematics
Sharon Emerson-Stonnell, PhD, Professor of Mathematics
Jacqueline A. Hall, PhD, Associate Professor of Mathematics
Ilya Gershevich Kerzhner, PhD, Lecturer in Mathematics
Virginia Lewis MS, Lecturer in Mathematics Education
Leigh Lunsford, PhD, Associate Professor of Mathematics
Gary T. Nelson, PhD, Professor of Mathematics Education
Rebecca S. Nelson, PhD Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education
Phillip L. Poplin, PhD, Assistant Professor of Mathematics
David Shoenthal, PhD, Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Robert P. Webber, PhD, Professor of Computer Science and Mathematics

The mathematics curriculum stresses breadth, theory, and depth in the study of mathematics while allowing the student the flexibility to choose among topics of their interest. Mathematics majors who have completed Mathematics 262 may not enroll in a 100-level mathematics course.

While every attempt is made to state the requirements and concentrations available in the department as succinctly as possible, it is recommended that every student majoring or minoring in the department continue in close communication with the academic advisor assigned by the department in order to plan the program best suited to individual needs and goals.

Students desiring a minor in mathematics or computer science must successfully complete the appropriate program described below, and must see the Chair of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science to declare officially a minor in either field.

MATHEMATICS MAJOR, BA or BS DEGREE

A. General Education Core Requirements/41 credits
Majors are required to take PHIL 300 for General Education Goal 12,
MATH 350 for General Education Goal 13.

B. BS Degree Additional Degree Requirements/7 credits
A student seeking the BS degree must take CMSC 160 as his/her Mathematics or Computer Science elective.
BA Degree Additional Degree Requirements/6 credits

C. Major Requirements/37-39 credits (plus 4 credits included in General Education
MATH 261 The Differential and Integral Calculus/4 credits
(3 of these credits satisfy General Education Goal 5).
MATH 262
The Differential and Integral Calculus/4 credits
MATH 300 A Transition to Advanced Mathematics/3 credits
MATH 343 Linear Algebra/3 credits
MATH 361 Calculus III/4 credits
MATH 342 or MATH 462 Introduction to Modern Algebra or Advanced Calculus/3 credits
MATH 371 Introduction to Probability and Statistics/3 credits
MATH 461 Senior Seminar/1 credit
CMSC 492 or MATH 492 or MATH 490 or MAED 453/1-3 credits
(1 credit satisfies General Education Goal 15)

Electives**
Students must complete a total of 15 hours from 300 - 400 level Mathematics courses, or CMSC 300, and in so doing must complete one of the following sequences:
Sequence 1*
MATH 405 Numerical Analysis/3 credits
AND MATH 460 Differential Equations/3 credits
Sequence 2*
MATH 342 Introduction to Modern Algebra/3 credits
AND MATH 462 Advanced Calculus/3 credits
Sequence 3*
MATH 371 Introduction to Probability and Statistics/3 credits
AND MATH 472 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics/3 credits

*Sequence 1 recommended for students considering working in applied mathematics, Sequence 2 recommended for students in mathematics education or students considering graduate school in mathematics, and Sequence 3 recommended for students interested in pursuing careers in statistics.
**Electives may NOT include:

MATH 267 Applications of Calculus/ 4 credits
MATH 271 Applied Statistics/ 3 credits
MATH 309 Numeration Systems/ 3 credits
MATH 310 Functions, Probability, and Statistics/ 3 credits
MATH 313 Geometry and Reasoning/ 3 credits
MATH 330 Integration of Mathematics and Science Principles/ 1.5 credits
MATH 430 Teaching Mathematics in the Middle School/ 3 credits
MATH 451 The Teaching of High School Mathematics/ 3 credits
MATH 482 Directed Teaching in the Secondary School/ 11 credits
MATH 350 Ethical Issues

D. Secondary Education Endorsement, grades 6-12/ 38 - 50 credits
MATH 245 History of Mathematics/ 2 credits
MATH 335* Advanced Euclidean Geometry/ 3 credits
MATH 342* Introduction to Modern Algebra/ 3 credits
MATH 462* Advanced Calculus/ 3 credits
MATH 451 The Teaching of High School Mathematics/ 3 credits
MATH 482 Directed Teaching in the Secondary School/ 11 credits
MAED 289** Admission to Field Experience/ 1 credit
MAED 452 Practicum I in Mathematics/ 3 credits
MAED 453* Practicum II in Mathematics/ 3 credits
EDUC 245 Human Growth and Development/ 3 credits
EDUC 260 Introduction to the Teaching Profession/ 2 credits
EDUC 299 Admission to Teacher Preparation/ 0 credits
EDUC 380 Classroom Assessment/ 2 credits
EDUC 430 Teaching Reading in the Content Area/ 2 credits
EDUC 455 Principles of Secondary Education/ 1 credit
EDUC 484 Media and Technology/1 credit
EDUC 487 Classroom Management and System Issues/ 3 credits
EDUC 488 Education Seminar/1 credit
SPED 489 Survey of Exception Children/ 3 credits
* MATH 335, MATH 342, MATH 462, and MAED 453 may count towards the mathematics major.
** Students must earn a "Pass" in MAED 289 before they will be permitted to enroll in MATH 451.

E. General Electives (non-teaching majors)/35-38

F. Total Credits Required for BA or BS in Mathematics/120
Total Credits Required for BS in Mathematics with Secondary Teaching Endorsement/124-137

For additional Endorsement to teach Computer Science, Minor in Computer Science/18 hours

For additional Endorsement to teach Algebra I (grades 6-12) complete Algebra I endorsement/25-26 credits. See below.

MINOR IN MATHEMATICS

Minor Requirements/21 credits
MATH 261 The Differential and Integral Calculus
MATH 262 The Differential and Integral Calculus
MATH 343 Linear Algebra
MATH 361 Calculus III
**Electives: Six additional credits consisting of MATH 271, CMSC 300, or mathematics at the 300 - 400 level.

**Electives may NOT include:
MATH 267 Applications of Calculus/4 credits
MATH 309 Numeration Systems/3 credits
MATH 310 Functions, Probability, and Statistics/3 credits
MATH 313 Geometry and Reasoning/3 credits
MATH 330 Integration of Math and Science Principles/1.5 credits
MATH 350 Ethical Issues in Mathematics and Computer Science/3 credits
MATH 430 Teaching Mathematics in the Middle School/3 credits
MATH 451 The Teaching of High School Mathematics/3 credits
MATH 482 Directed Teaching in the Secondary School/11 credits

ALGEBRA I ENDORSEMENT

Students who are preparing to teach and who are majoring in fields other than mathematics may be endorsed to teach mathematics courses through Algebra I in grades 6 - 12 by taking the courses listed below.

Algebra I Endorsement Requirements/25 credits
MATH 164 Precalculus/3 credits
MATH 181 OR MATH 343 Finite Mathematics/3 credits OR Linear Algebra/3 credits
MATH 261 OR MATH 267 The Differential and Integral Calculus/4 credits OR Applications of Calculus/4 credits
MATH 309 Numeration Systems/3 credits
MATH 310 Functions, Probability, and Statistics/3 credits
MATH 313 OR MATH 335 Geometry and Reasoning/3 credits OR Advanced Euclidean Geometry/3 credits
MATH 430 Teaching Mathematics in the Middle School/3 credits
CMSC 121 OR CMSC 160 Introduction to Computer Science/3 credits OR Introduction to Algorithmic Design I/3 credits

MATHEMATICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (MATH)

General Education Course*
Writing Intensive Course**
Speaking Intensive Course***

Mathematics 114. Mathematics for the Consumer. An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with the application of mathematics in the life of the consumer. Special attention will be given to the algebraic derivation of formulas, the reduction of real life situations to mathematical models, and the mathematics employed in banking, budgeting, credit, taxes, insurance, installment buying, annuities, stocks, bonds, and3 credits.

Mathematics 121. Functions and Graphs. Graphical, numerical, and algebraic approaches to modeling with functions. Emphasizes constructing models based on linear, exponential, power, and trigonometric functions. 3 credits. *

Mathematics 131. Mathematical Thinking. An introduction to mathematical thinking through various studies. Mathematical patterns in the world around us through topics such as the Golden Ration, Fibonacci series, Pi, fractals, chaos. Basic number theory and modular arithmetic applied to cryptology, check digit schemes, and music theory. Introductory statistics and finance. 3 credits. *

Mathematics 164. Precalculus. A study of functions with an emphasis on exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions in order to prepare the student for calculus. 3 credits.*

Mathematics 171. Statistical Decision Making. An elementary statistics course designed to show the student how statistics is used in problem solving and decision making. Topics include measures of central tendency and variability; elementary probability concepts; the binomial, normal and Chi-square distributions, correlation and regression; and hypothesis testing. Special emphasis is placed upon the proper use of statistics in real life situations. 3 credits. *

Mathematics 181. Finite Mathematics. A study of discrete mathematical structures with applications primarily to business and economics. Topics will be selected from a review of sets; linear and quadratic functions; solving systems of linear equations using Gauss-Jordan elimination; matrix algebra; solutions of inequalities; linear programming, including the graphical methods and introduction to the simplex method; introductory probability; introduction to calculus; and mathematics of finance. 3 credits. 

Mathematics 245. History of Mathematics. An introduction to the history of mathematics, concentrating on the period from the Greeks through the 19th century. The student will learn the historical development of many mathematical topics taught in middle and high school today. 2 credits.  Offered spring of odd numbered years.

Mathematics 261, 262. The Differential and Integral Calculus. A unified course dealing with the basic ideas of calculus and analytic geometry. Prerequisite for MATH 262: successful completion of 261. Students who do not make a C or better in 261 should have the consent of the chair before enrolling in 262. 4 credits.

Mathematics 267. Applications of Calculus. A course designed for students in Business, Economics, and the Social and Life Sciences. The techniques of calculus are presented in an informal approach. Emphasis is on applications of the mathematical concepts of calculus, e.g., break-even analysis, optimization, spread of epidemics, population growth models. Credit will not be given in this course toward the mathematics major. Prerequisite: MATH 164 or equivalent. 4 credits. * Offered every Spring.

Mathematics 271. Applied Statistics. Topics include measures of central tendency, probability distributions, measures of dispersion, correlation and linear regression, multiple linear regression, analysis of variance and covariance. The emphasis will be on linear modeling techniques to conduct hypothesis tests. Computer applications will be an integral part of the course. Knowledge of calculus will not be required. Credit will not be given toward the mathematics majors. Prerequisite: MATH 171.  3 credits. Offered every Spring.

Mathematics 292. Internship in Mathematics. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of mathematics. 1-18 credits.

Mathematics 295. Special Topics. Selected topics in mathematics. The topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

Mathematics 300. A Transition to Advanced Mathematics. An introduction to rigorous mathematical proof with focus on the properties of the real number system. Topics include elementary symbolic logic, mathematical induction, algebra of sets, relations, countability, algebraic and completeness properties of the reals. Prerequisite: MATH 262 or consent of instructor.  It is strongly recommended that a student have a C or better in MATH 262.  It is also strongly recommended that a student have a C or better in this course before proceeding with future coursework.  3 credits.  Offered every spring. **

Mathematics 309. Numeration Systems. A study of different numeration systems. The development and characteristics of ancient numeration systems, base numeration systems and the real number system will be studied. Problem solving is emphasized. 3 credits.

Mathematics 310. Functions, Probability and Statistics. Examines functions, probability and statistics in the context of real life situations and will include student investigations and hands on activities. Prerequisite: MATH 309 and proficiency in computer spreadsheets, or permission of instructor. 3 credits.

Mathematics 311, 312. Studies Abroad. Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses in mathematics. 1-18 credits.

Mathematics 313. Geometry and Reasoning. A basic study of polygons, polyhedra, measurement, transformational geometry, coordinate geometry, descriptive statistics, graphical methods and empirical and theoretical probabilities and their uses. 3 credits.

Mathematics 330 (Science 330). Integration of Mathematics and Science Principles. An inquiry into basic principles involved in the study of mathematics and science. Emphasis on measurement, use of manipulatives, inference, prediction, data analysis, and hypothesizing. For Liberal Studies Majors only. Students are required to take SCED 330 concurrently with this course. 1.5 credits each.  Offered every spring.

Mathematics 335. Advanced Euclidean Geometry. A study of Euclidean geometry from a more advanced viewpoint. The methods and techniques of synthetic axiomatic geometry will be stressed through a study of logic and formal proof, constructions, higher Euclidean geometry, finite geometries, and non-Euclidean geometries. Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 261. 3 credits.  Offered fall of odd numbered years.

Mathematics 336. Survey of Modern Geometries. A study designed to widen and enlarge the horizons of the students through an examination of some of the geometric developments since the time of Euclid. The characteristics and interrelatedness of various geometries-topological, projective, affine, similarity, Euclidean, non-Euclidean and inversion-will be briefly examined through transformations. Prerequisite: MATH 300. 3 credits.  Offered based on sufficient student interest.

Mathematics 342. Introduction to Modern Algebra. Sets and mappings, integers, general algebraic systems, groups, rings, and fields. Prerequisite: MATH 300. 3 credits.  Offered fall of odd numbered years.

Mathematics 343. Linear Algebra. A basic study of vector spaces, linear transformations, and their relationships to matrix algebra. Also included are determinants, isomorphism theorems, linear functionals, and dual spaces. Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 262. 3 credits.  Offered every spring.

Mathematics 345. Number Theory. An introductory course in additive and multiplicative number theory. Included are topics such as: divisibility, prime numbers, congruences, residue systems, linear and quadratic congruences, Diophantine equations, quadratic residues, and number theoretic functions. Prerequisite/corequisite: MATH 300. 3 credits.  Offered based on sufficient student interest.

Mathematics 350 (Computer Science 350). Ethical Issues in Mathematics and Computer Science. Consideration of ethical implications of mathematics and computer science in society. Overview of ethical theory; case studies of situations illustrating ethical dilemmas. A knowledge of calculus and algorithms will be assumed. 3 credit. *, ** and ***

Mathematics 351. Introduction to Topology. Topological spaces, continuous mappings, homeomorphisms, compactness, connectedness, metric spaces, and other selected topics in point set topology. Prerequisite: MATH 300, 361. 3 credits.  Offered based on sufficient student interest.

Mathematics 361. Calculus III. Advanced topics in calculus not considered in MATH 261, 262. Prerequisite: MATH 262. Students who do not make C or better in 262 should have consent of the chair before enrolling. 4 credits.

Mathematics 371. Introduction to Probability and Statistics. Theory of probability; expected values of random variables; discrete and continuous probability distributions. Prerequisite: MATH 361. 3 credits.  Offered every fall.

Mathematics 390. Directed Study in Mathematics. Individualized study; recommended only when material cannot be studied through existing course offerings. Must have permission of department chair. 1-3 credits. May be repeated as 391, etc.; no more than 6 credits. 

Mathematics 392. Internship in Mathematics. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of mathematics. 1-18 credits. 

Mathematics 395.  Special Topics in Mathematics.  Selected topics in mathematics. The topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

Mathematics 405. Numerical Analysis. An investigation of numerical techniques of approximation, matrix computations, integration, and differentiation with emphasis on the solution of non-linear equations, linear systems and differential equations. The course will require use of the computer. Attention will be given to the problems of rounding error, conditioning, and stability. Prerequisite: MATH 343, 361 and CMSC 160 or equivalent. 3 credits.  Offered spring of even numbered years.

Mathematics 430. Teaching Mathematics in the Middle Schools. A study of current practices in middle-school mathematics teaching with emphasis on principles, techniques, and materials. Required for those planning to teach middle school mathematics. 3 credits.  Offered every spring. 

Mathematics 435 (Computer Science 435). Queuing Theory and Simulation. A course covering the basic mathematics of queuing systems and the principles of the computer simulation of queuing systems. Topics include M/M1, M/G/1, and G/M/1 queues, La-place and z-transforms, priority queuing, and basic computer simulation techniques. Prerequisite: CMSC 160, MATH 261. 3 credits.  Offered based on sufficient student interest.

Mathematics 451. The Teaching of High School Mathematics. A study of current practices in high school mathematics teaching with emphasis on principles, techniques, and materials. Includes placement in a secondary classroom. Required for those planning to teach high school mathematics. 3 credits.  Offered spring of even numbered years.

Mathematics 460. Differential Equations. Primarily a study of ordinary differential equations of the first and second order with application to elementary work in mechanics and physics. Prerequisite: MATH 361. 3 credits.  Offered every fall.

Mathematics 461. Senior Seminar. A capstone course for the mathematics major. Emphasis will be on problem solving, connections between various branches of mathematics. Prerequisite: Mathematics Major and Senior Status. 1 credit. ***  Offered every fall.

Mathematics 462. Advanced Calculus. A theoretical approach to the study of limits, continuity, differentials, derivatives, and integrals. Development of the real number system, elementary point set theory, functions of several variables, infinite series, and power series. Prerequisite: MATH 300, 361. 3 credits.  Offered fall of even numbered years.

Mathematics 472. Introduction to Mathematical Statistics. Distribution of functions of random variables; moments and moment generating functions; T, F and Chi-square distributions; limiting distributions; interval estimation; tests of hypotheses; the Central Limit Theorem; regression analysis; ANOVA. Prerequisite: MATH 361, 371. 3 credits.  Offered spring of odd numbered years.

Mathematics 481. Complex Analysis. An introduction to the fundamental concepts of complex analysis, including the complex plane, holomorphic functions, the exponential function, Cauchy integral formula, Taylor series, Laurent series, conformal maps, the notion of residues and some applications in physics. Prerequisite: MATH 361. 3 credits.  Offered based on sufficient student interest.

Mathematics 482. Directed Teaching in the Secondary School. This course is required of all students seeking Secondary Teaching Licensure in Mathematics. Each student is assigned to work with a qualified cooperating teacher in a selected school setting. The student teacher will follow the schedule of the cooperating teacher. Prerequisite: Completion of all methods courses and a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5. 11 credits. ***  Offered as needed.

Mathematics 490. Directed Study in Mathematics. Individualized study; recommended only when material cannot be studied through existing course offerings. Must have permission of department chair. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for no more than 6 credits. ***

Mathematics 492. Internship in Mathematics. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of mathematics. 1-18 credits. *** 

Mathematics 495. Special Topics in Mathematics. Selected topics in mathematics that require a student to have a firm grasp of proof techniques. The topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. Prerequisite: MATH 300. 1-3 credits. 

Mathematics 498. Honors Research in Mathematics. Students conduct research in mathematics under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee. May be repeated as 499. 3 credits.

For Graduates and Advanced Undergraduates

Mathematics 513. The Teaching of Probability and Statistics. This course is designed especially for teachers and will use an experiential, informal, activity-based approach. There will be hands-on activities and experiments relating empirical and theoretical probabilities. Quick descriptive statistics and new graphical methods will be presented. These techniques are useful in describing, comparing, exploring and interpreting sets of data. There will also be intuitive ideas from inferential statistics. 3 credits.

Mathematics 595. Special Topics in Mathematics. Selected topics in mathematics. The topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (MAED)

Mathematics Education 289.  Early Mathematics Field Experience.  Structured field experiences to be completed during the freshman and sophomore years. Required of all students applying for admission to secondary mathematics methods courses. 1 credit.

Mathematics Education 452.  Practicum in Mathematics I.  An in-depth observation and participation practicum. Placed in public school settings for at least 60 hours under supervision of Longwood faculty. Taken concurrently with MATH 451. 3 credits.  Prerequisite:  MAED 289 or permission of instructor.  Offered spring semester of even numbered years. 

Mathematics Education 453.  Practicum in Mathematics II. An in-depth observation and participation practicum. Placed in public school settings for at least 60 hours under supervision of Longwood faculty. Prerequisite: Passing score on Praxis II and MATH 451, MAED452 or permission of instructor. 3 credits.  Offered fall semester of even numbered years. ***

COMPUTER SCIENCE PROGRAM

Faculty

John R. Graham, Ph D, Assistant Professor of Computer Science
Robert Marmorstein, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Computer Science
Jeffery H. Peden, PhD, Associate Professor of Computer Science
Robert P. Webber, PhD, Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science

While every attempt is made to state the requirements and concentrations available in the department as succinctly as possible, it is recommended that every student majoring or minoring in the department continue in close communication with the academic advisor assigned by the department in order to plan the program best suited to individual needs and goals.

Students desiring a minor in computer science must successfully complete the appropriate program described below, and must see the Chair of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science to officially declare a minor in this field.

COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR, BA or BS DEGREE

A. General Education Core Requirements/41 credits

Computer Science majors are required to take Phil 300 for general education goal 12; CMSC 350 for general education goal 13.

BA Degree Additional Degree Requirements/6 credits
BS Degree Additional Degree Requirements/7 credits

Students seeking a BS degree cannot take a 100-level Computer Science course as their Mathematics or Computer Science elective.

C. Major Requirements/62-64 credits (plus 4 credits included in General Education)

Computer Science Majors must earn a C or better in any CMSC course for it to count towards the major.

Computer Science Foundations/24-26 hours (plus 1 credit included in General Education)
CMSC 160 Introduction to Algorithmic Design I /3 credits
CMSC 162 Introduction to Algorithmic Design II /3 credits
CMSC 240 Data Structures /3 credits
CMSC 220 or CIMS 372 or CMSC 215 or CMSC 210/3 credits (second language)
CMSC 301 Computer Organization and Assembler Language Programming/3 credits
CMSC 408 Software Engineering/3 credits
CMSC 461 Seminar in Computer Science/ 3 credits
ENGL 319 Technical Writing/3 credits
CMSC 492 or CMSC 490 /1-3 credits (satisfies General Education Goal 15)

Advanced Computer Science Topics/18 hours
CMSC 306 Computer Organization/3 credits
CMSC 308 Organization of Programming Languages/3 credits
CMSC 310 Introduction to Operating Systems and Computer Architecture/3 credits
CMSC 360 Computer Network Theory/3 credits
CMSC 362 Theory of Databases/3 credits
CMSC 445 Compiler Design/3 credits

Mathematics Foundations/11 hours (plus 3 credits included in General Education):
MATH 261 The Differential and Integral Calculus/4 credits (3 of these 4 credits satisfy General Education Goal 5)
MATH 262 The Differential and Integral Calculus/4 credits
MATH 371 Introduction to Probability and Statistics
or MATH 271 Applied Statistics/3 credits
CMSC 300 or MATH 300/3 credits

Electives /9 credits
Any 300 or 400 level CMSC course not listed above (excluding CMSC 350) or Math 435.

D. General Electives, BS degree/8-10 credits
General Electives, BA degree/9-11 credits

E. Total Credits Required for BA or BS degree/120

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

A minor in computer science shall consist of CMSC 160, CMSC 162, CMSC 240, and at least 9 additional hours of CMSC courses at the 300 or 400 level (excluding CMSC 350)/18 credits

MINOR IN COMPUTER SECURITY, FORENSICS, AND LAW

Students may pursue a minor in Computer Security, Forensics, and Law. Students pursuing this interdisciplinary minor will take courses in Computer Information Management Systems, Computer Science, and Criminology and Criminal Justice.
(Please refer to requirements listed in College of Business & Economics)

COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (CMSC)

General Education *
Writing Intensive Course **
Speaking Intensive Course ***

Computer Science 121. Introduction to Computer Science. An introduction to computer science for non-specialists. Basic computer architecture and design, storage formats, principles of computer operation, and algorithms. Application software that emphasizes the computer as a tool. 3 credits.

Computer Science 160.  Introduction to Algorithmic Design I.  An introduction to problem solving and algorithmic design using a modern high-level programming language. Topics include: problem solving techniques, high-level structures, subprograms and modularity, simple, aggregate and user-defined types and fundamental algorithms.  Program clarity, good coding style, and effective documentation are stressed. No prerequisites.   

Computer Science 162. Introduction to Algorithmic Design II. A continuation of CMSC 160.  Topics include algorithmic design, complexity analysis, abstract data types, and encapsulation and basic data structures.  Advanced topics using a modern high-level programming language include dynamic memory allocation, recursion, inheritance, overloading, and use of objects.  Prerequisites:   grade of C or better in CMSC 160.
Computer Science 210.
Web Page Design and Scripting. The class will study interactive web pages that provide customized data in response to visitor requests and/or collect data form site visitors. This interaction will be done via program scripts written in an appropriate language. Prerequisite: CMSC 160 or permission of the instructor. 3 credits.

Computer Science 215. Introduction to Fortran. An overview of the FORTRAN programming language, with emphasis on applications to mathematics and science. Prerequisites: knowledge of another computer language. 3 credits.

Computer Science 220. Advanced Java Programming. This class develops the skills for programming using the Java Programming Language.  This is an advanced programming course and it is assumed that the student has the required programming skills acquired from previous C and C++ programming classes.  Prerequisite: CMSC 160 or permission of the instructor.

Computer Science 240. Data Structures. : A continuation of CMSC 162.  Topics include Analysis of Algorithms with an emphasis on computational complexity.  Advanced algorithms may include self adjusting trees, hashing, graphs, advanced sorting and searching methods and greedy algorithms.  Prerequisite:  grade of C or better in CMSC 162.

Computer Science 290. Self Study in Programming. Independent study of a specific programming language, its syntax and applications, based on prior study of programming languages in general. May not duplicate other language courses. Must be arranged with an instructor and approved by department chair before registering. May be repeated for credit with different languages. Prerequisite: CMSC 162. 1 credit.

Computer Science 292. Internship in Computer Science. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of computer science. 1-18 credits.

Computer Science 295. Special Topics. Selected topics in computer science. The topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

Computer Science 300. Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science. Topics in discrete mathematics used in computer science, including methods of proof, graphs, computability, and formal grammars. Prerequisite: CMSC 162. 3 credits.

Computer Science 301. Computer Organization and Assembler Language Programming. Assembler language programming; addressing techniques; internal storage structure; machine-level representation of instructions and data; sub-routines. Prerequisite: CMSC 162 or consent of instructor. Fall only; 3 credits.

Computer Science 306. Computer Organization. The organization and structuring of the major hardware components of computers; the mechanics of information transfer and control within a computer system; standard computer architectures; the fundamentals of logic design. Prerequisite: CMSC 162. 3 credits.

Computer Science 308. Organization of Programming Languages. Topics include language and definition structure, data types and structures, control structures and data flow, run-time characteristics and lexical analysis and parsing. Programming assignments will involve the use of several different languages. Prerequisite: CMSC 162 or permission of instructor. 3 credits. **

Computer Science 310. Introduction to Operating Systems and Computer Architecture. Emphasis will be placed on concepts rather than case studies and on the interdependence of operating systems and architecture. Topics include instruction sets, I/O and interrupt structure, addressing schemes, microprogramming, memory management and recovery procedures. Prerequisite: CMSC 162. 3 credits.

Computer Science 311, 312. Studies Abroad. Primarily intended for transfer of credit earned abroad in courses in computer science. 1-18 credits.

Computer Science 350. (Mathematics 350). Ethical Issues in Mathematics and Computer Science. Consideration of ethical implications of mathematics and computer science in society. Overview of ethical theory; case studies of situations illustrating ethical dilemmas. A knowledge of calculus and algorithms will be assumed. 3 credits. * and ***

Computer Science 355. Introduction to Computer and Network Security. A course dealing with basic techniques in computer and network security. Topics covered include elementary cryptography, secure programs, malicious code, protection of operating systems, database security, network security, security administration and legal issues. Prerequisites: CMSC 160. 3 credits.

Computer Science 360. Computer Network Theory. A course covering the theory and design of modern computer networks. Topics include local and wide area networks, the OSI network model, basic network performance analysis, and real time networks. Prerequisite: CMSC 162. 3 credits.

Computer Science 362. Theory of Databases. A course covering the theory and practice of modern databases design and implementation. Topics include relational and hierarchical database design, database query languages, update consistency, and distributed databases. Prerequisite: CMSC 162. 3 credits. **

Computer Science 381. Introduction to Graphics Programming. This course is designed to introduce students to computer graphics programming techniques. It will combine the use of a high level programming language with a publicly available graphics application programming interface. Other topics will include the mathematics to manipulate geometric objects. Prerequisites: CMSC 162, MATH 261. 3 credits.

Computer Science 389. Artificial Intelligence. An advanced theory and programming course covering the theory and techniques of artificial intelligence. Topics covered include computer vision, game playing, min-max algorithms, and an introduction to the LISP programming language. Prerequisite: CMSC 162. 3 credits.

Computer Science 390. Directed Study in Computer Science. Individualized study; recommended only when material cannot be studied through existing course offerings. Must have permission of department chair. 1-3 credits. May be repeated as CMSC 391, etc.; no more than 6 credits.

Computer Science 392. Internship in Computer Science. A semester-long, on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of computer science. 1-18 credits.

Computer Science 408. Software Engineering. A language independent course covering the principles of software engineering including traditional and object-oriented software design, software lifecycle models, software analysis, and management implications. The implementation of developing software using teams will be stressed along with various software tools. Reusability, portability, and interoperability will also be discussed. The choice of implementation language for course projects may vary from year to year. (Speaking Intensive) Prerequisites: CMSC 162. 3 credits. ***

Computer Science 415. Theory of Computation. The basic theories underlying computer science, such as language and automata theory, and the computability of functions. Emphasis is placed on the development of theoretical machine and language descriptions. Prerequisite: CMSC 300. 3 credits.

Computer Science 435. (Mathematics 435) Queuing Theory and Simulation. A course covering the basic mathematics of queuing systems and the principles of the computer simulation of queuing systems. Topics include M/M1, M/G/1, and G/M/1 queues, Laplace and z-transforms, priority queuing, and basic computer simulation techniques. Prerequisites: CMSC 160, MATH 261. 3 credits.

Computer Science 445. Compiler Design. A course covering the basic theory and techniques of compiler and code translation systems. Topics include lexical analysis, parsing, and code generation, and the various techniques used when handling differing source language classes. A programming intensive course. Also covered are the techniques of top-down and bottom-up parsing. Prerequisite: CMSC 300. 3 credits.

Computer Science 452. Computers in Education. A survey of programming languages, software, and hardware commonly found in an educational setting. Prerequisite: CMSC 121 or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

Computer Science 455. Network Security and Cryptography. This course covers several modern cryptographic systems, including the DES and AES encryption standards. Their applications to network security are discussed, along with issues of authentication, privacy,
intruders, malicious programs and firewalls. The approach is from the theoretical side, and the mathematics of these areas is studied. Prerequisites: CMSC 160 and a background in discrete mathematics. 3 credits.

Computer Science 461. Seminar in Computer Science. This course is the capstone experience in the computer science major. A segment on assessment will be included. Corequisite: Satisfaction of all other requirements for the computer science major or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

Computer Science 490. Directed Study in Computer Science. Individualized study; recommended only when material cannot be studied through existing course offerings. Must have permission of department chair. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for no more than 6 credits. ***

Computer Science 492. Internship in Computer Science. A semester-long on-the-job learning experience designed to apply the principles of computer science. 1-18 credits. ***

Computer Science 495. Special Topics. Selected topics in computer science. The topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit when topics change. 1-3 credits.

Computer Science 498. Honors Research in Computer Science. Students conduct research in computer science under the direction of a faculty member and the Senior Honors Research Committee. May be repeated as 499. 3 credits.